what’s under the kilt

April 24, 1997, Hong Kong — Lance Corporal Lee Wotherspoon of the Black Watch (RHR) lowers the Union Jack as the wind raises his kilt at the daily lowering of the flag at Hong Kong’s Cenotaph prior to the former British Colony being handed over to China on July 1, 1997.

Apparently, he received romantic letters from several women and a few men around the world admiring his attributes — reportedly he was rebuked by his commander only because his sock-tops were not level.

The rule against wearing anything under the kilt was once so strict that until World War II inspections of Black Watch troops included having them step on a mirror. For officers, violating the rule cost the offender a bottle of port. Now the under-the-kilt dress is optional, but options don’t come easily to men who believe in tradition most highland kilted soldiers go regimental.

World War II inspections of Black Watch troops included having them step on a mirror. For officers, violating the rule cost the offender a bottle of port. Now the under-the-kilt dress is optional, but options don’t come easily to men who believe in tradition most highland kilted soldiers go regimental.

 

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